When Cardiff went an extra mile for Hatching the Past (Dinosaur Babies)!

 

I frankly thought that, after seeing so many settings of Gondwana Studio’s  Hatching The Past I was never going to be surprised by attending  yet another opening… boy was I wrong! First of all the team of the Museum of Wales decided that our exhibition was as important as it should be,  really worth the wonderful settings of the museum, and organised an opening event to remember… A labour of love. Children swarmed everywhere (obviously)  and were treated to music, theatre, pantomime dinosaurs and even a short introductory video that showed the reason of the enormous dinosaur footprints you had to follow to get into the museum AND avoid the broken column and statue that left that violent entrance of the pesky Tarbosaurus  of the exhibition!  

The drama was perfectly set for the general enjoyment… and Carmen and I felt privileged to see all my familiar pieces with the wonderful casts of Peter Norton in this  luscious, spacious setting. The dramatic light enhanced the specimens and enormous murals… different from any previous Hatching The Past events…

For us  adult attendants there was an extra surprise: they have on loan the ORIGINAL, almost legendary,  Therizinosaur eggs with embryos marvellously prepared by Terry Manning! We almost fainted at their mere sight (first time for me)… the detail is astounding and the preparation exquisite.  All this tells you a lot: not only regarding the great work  and efforts of the team at the Museum of Wales, but of the versatility of the exhibition itself, enhanced by the guests of honour: the original Therizinosaur embryos.  Don’t miss it this time either… everybody should enjoy the enhanced Hatching the Past once again, and again!

Many thanks to our hosts headed by the gracious Cindy Howells, that took us in a general tour of the museum and its vaults, filled with hundreds of thousands of precious specimens, from gigantic ichthyosaurs to microscopic algae … it included even 1830’s Henry De La Beche original drawing of Mary Anning’s fossil reptiles!

Duria_Antiquior-1.jpg

She made our first visit the the Museum of Wales  even more relevant. I’m looking forward to continue to work with them in the near future. Hard to beat this setting of Hatching the Past in the Museum of Wales!

Fro right to left: John Nudds, Cindy Howells, Chris Moore, myself . Picture taker: Tracey Marler. Thanks to all!DSC03152 2.JPG

Advertisements
Posted in Dinosaur Babies, Hatching The Past, Museum Displays, Museum of Wales, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Utahraptor’s Week changes everything…

Utahraptor final copy.jpg

Scott Hartman has blown everybody’s mind with his new skeletal restoration of the intriguing giant dromeosaur. I seized the opportunity to actually “finish” my “Archaeopteryx Family” mural touring with the recent show by Silver Plume Exhibitions’ “Dinosaurs Take Flight, The Art of Archaeopteryx” and that might be arriving to your town very  soon, albeit (for the time being) still with the old incomplete mural… The reason it was incomplete was not the mystery surrounding Utahraptor: it was meant to show only part of it so the size would be somehow more appreciated and the rest of Archie’s family highlighted…

But, since Jim Kirkland presented it for the first time, given the new evidence, and having been requested by many,  I can show the new, full Utahraptor in all its weird glory.  Since Dakotaraptor is mostly unknown (and partly a chimaera), this the better known, ultimate giant dromeosaur! I say “weird” because Scott has shown us an unusually large-headed monster with limbs that are actually not what we were expecting. The animal is powerful indeed, but the hands and feet are small by comparison… all the force lays in the head, and short torso. The tail is also not as long as previously thought and more flexible, without those Velociraptor and Deinonychus stiffing rods.

So here, presenting it for the first time: the full mural! I don’t thing there’s a weirder, more magnificent  and diverse family in the animal kingdom… I’d like to add more members in the future!Raptor FamilyNEWCopy copy.jpg

Posted in Dinosaurs Take Flight, maniraptora, Museum Displays, Raptors, Silver Plume Exhibitions, The Art of Archaeopteryx, Uncategorized, Utahraptor, velociraptor | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Ceratopsians from Aldama…

Aldama Alt copy

Our Mexican dinosaur spree continues! Presenting a herd of mid-sized chasmosaurine ceratosians from the region of Aldama, Chihuahua, Mexico indicates that there were more species relative to Nasutoceratops. The Museo del Mammut in the northern state of Chihuahua has tried this reconstruction, but with the clear exception of the frill and some other cranial fragments,  the museum present us here with a charming chimaera concocted with various unrelated dinosaur remains!

Ceratópsido Aldama So after working with René HernándezAngel Ramírez has set up and tried to reconstruct the animal based on its Nasutoceratops affinities… although it is not known, it probably had no nose horn and, just as in Yehuecauhceratops, the frill shows parietals that are wider than the squamosal.

Centrosaurino Aldama 2016According the fossils around it, it was hunted by small tyrannosaurs with Daspletosaurus or Albertosaurus characteristics and there were big tree trunks, since the region wasn’t as coastal as the others I have been depicting. Yet another window into the fragmentary, but abundant, fossil material from Mexico.

Posted in ceratopsians, Mexican Prehistory, Museum Displays, Ornithischians, Theropods, tyrannosaurs, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Proud to present: Dinosaur rEvolution. Secrets of Survival, The Motion Picture. Live in Tasmania!

DSC06702Please click in the links…  Gondwana Studios Exhibitions

The Dinosaur rEvolution – Secrets of Survival Video by the Royal Society of Tasmania

Things are evolving very quickly… these videos  are just the starting point… and there will be more in the future with revised, added material and  a whole bunch of  revamped, updated information.

DSC06788 copy.JPG

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Sneak preview: Dinosaur rEvolution embarks in its first tour!

The City of Albury is a local government area in the Riverina region of New South Wales, Australia DinosaurRevolution at Albury City and it has become home of the debut of  the efforts of Gondwana Studios and myself in this very ambitious project… and that might be calling to your city one of these days!DSC06663

It has take us two years and (specially) the enormous efforts and dedication of Peter Norton,  that has also entrusted me as curator and illustrator of this project… you will never see the chronicle of the evolution of dinosaur skin the same way anywhere!  From  sclaes,protofeathers, to quills, to spikes, to feathers and the arms race that only one group of dinosaurs would win!

DSC06714

We have gone to painstaking efforts to gather as many notorious specimens as possible. Unfortunately the venue space hasn’t allowed to mount all the specimens and have them in the order I originally envisioned. But we do have casts of Heterodontosaurus,  Archaeopteryx, AnchiornisSinosauropteryx, Caudipteryx, Confuciusornis, Microraptor and the famous quilled psittacosaur…DSC06671DSC06673

And direct from our friends in  Lyme Regis, a cast of the most complete Scelidosaurus to date !DSC06674DSC06676

DSC06682

My ambition was to have life-size murals together with the wonderful specimens specially mounted and artfully finished by Peter Norton,  but we will have to wait until the next time. Still it looks wonderful.  Peter managed to include all these ceratopsian skulls , Saichania (including the tail club)Oviraptor, a Velociraptor hunting Avimimus, the arms of Deinocheirus and even Nothronychus…  and of course the tour-de-force, the peak of the arms struggle, the final collision of Ornithischia and Saurischia: Tarbosaurus vs. Talarurus! Only the descendants of one group would survive until now.

DSC06687

DSC06703DSC06698Velo Avi copyDSC06700DSC06689.jpgDSC06704

But what is really a novelty of this exhibition is its focus: we are aiming to show wider audiences a novel approach to understand the evolution of the Dinosauria and the triumph of one of its branches thanks to taking to the air using its peculiar skin structures: the birds’ feathers.

The exhibition is available for hire, with the potential of of using much more material  depending on the space (Including Pachycephalosaurs, Stegosaurs and even more Therizinosaurs and Ankulosaurs) … For more information  please do contact Peter Norton at  Gondwana Studios  for a PDF leaflet… or myself. Spread the word!

Expect more news  (and better pictures) about it in the very near future.

Posted in Archaeopteryx, Birds, ceratopsians, Deinocheirids, Dinosaur Models, Dinosaur rEvolution, maniraptora, Museum Displays, Ornithischians, ornithomimosaurs, oviraptorosaurs, pachycephalosaurs, Raptors, therizinosaurs, Theropods, tyrannosaurs, Uncategorized, velociraptor | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

A new take on Yehuecauhceratops.

Luis V. Rey Updates Blog

Yehue copy.jpgThe danger of having extremely fragmentary dinosaur remains like the ones found in Mexico is that they are  bound to different interpretations… and if we are not careful we can end up in opposite directions when it is time to reconstruct the animals. Meet my own take to a male and a female Yehuecauhceratops mudei, the  now famous  mid-sized ceratopsian from the Late Cretaceous Coahuila, Mexico.

I have been aided by Angel Ramírez in the reconstruction. As you can see I have also increased and bloated the size of the nostrils according to the latest trends of research… the space is massive so it is justified!

We followed closely the very fragmentary remains of the skull (specially the frill). And this is the final result… It appears to have been recognised by (among others) Peter Dodson as a closer relative to  Nasutoceratops than to Chasmosaurus and the model used…

View original post 183 more words

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

A new take on Yehuecauhceratops.

Yehue copy.jpgThe danger of having extremely fragmentary dinosaur remains like the ones found in Mexico is that they are  bound to different interpretations… and if we are not careful we can end up in opposite directions when it is time to reconstruct the animals. Meet my own take to a male and a female Yehuecauhceratops mudei, the  now famous  mid-sized ceratopsian from the Late Cretaceous Coahuila, Mexico.

I have been aided by Angel Ramírez in the reconstruction. As you can see I have also increased and bloated the size of the nostrils according to the latest trends of research… the space is massive so it is justified!

We followed closely the very fragmentary remains of the skull (specially the frill). And this is the final result… It appears to have been recognised by (among others) Peter Dodson as a closer relative to  Nasutoceratops than to Chasmosaurus and the model used for the frill is more like  than the aforementioned or even better: Avaceratops. So those were the main  references to follow.  The main characters are a reduced squamosal with three undulations (maybe bases for hooking keratinous display structures), a rugose lateral bump and expanded parietals.Yehuecauhceratops-2.png

Yehuecauhceratops mudei NEW ver-2 with skeleton.jpg  Here is his own most recent restoration of  the skeleton by Angel Ramírez. I specially thank him for his help and assistance… and allowing me the artistic license of including a flock of ornithomimids in the background (they are not flocking this way this time!)… together with the de-rigueur hadrosaurs .

This restoration may change in the future  once again, but for the time being this was the best we could come with.

UPDATE. An extra note requested by Angel Ramírez: his reconstruction used the silhouette and skeleton drawing of Scott Hartman of Avaceratops and modified it in what concerns the skull,  so that it looks more like a nasutoceratopsine.

The interpretation is based on the description of Rivera-Sylva, Hendrick and Dodson, 2016. A centrosaurine (dinosauria: ceratopsia) from the Aguja Formation (Late Campanian) of Northern Coahuila, Mexico.

Posted in ceratopsians, hadrosaurs, Mexican Prehistory, ornithomimosaurs, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment