More previews from the Kelly Tyrannosaur Project.

Kelly TrixFBAs we can see here… not everything tyrannosaur has to be Tyrannosaurus! This classic scene has been depicted many times…And it should have been an awesome one to watch. Triceratops was once depicted as a mud wrestler by Dr. Bob Bakker.

Mike Kelly has been painstakingly putting together a treaty about Tyrannosaurus that wants to embrace everything: from local environments, to the prey, to the extant contemporary fauna and to the different approaches to recreate the image of the über predator… feathers and no feathers,,,. Obviously after my “conversion” through the discovery of  Yutyrannus, there was no way I could go back to do Tyrannosaurus the way I had done all my life. Parsimony reigns in Palaeontology. We will need now hard evidence to see T. rex naked the way it used too be, even if for some  the acceptance of image transition has been and continues to be very hard. And that has included me and Mike himself… But once you make your mind about the new image and understand why,  the only question for the artist from then on is to make the image believable!  I’m really looking forward to see Mike Kelly’s book finished and published. It’s going to be a real achievement at every possible level. Tyr  rowB

Obviously the one showing the Keratin Revolution was not only T. rex… and Triceratops had to have his whole new make-up too! This time blending the hard evidence of hits skin,  I have used a B&W stripped  pattern that I have used before and curiously makes it blend quite well with the surroundings . Keep plugged in for more on the Keratin Revolution in the not so far future!

Posted in ceratopsians, tyrannosaurs, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Sneak preview: Dinosaur rEvolution embarks in its first tour!

The City of Albury is a local government area in the Riverina region of New South Wales, Australia DinosaurRevolution at Albury City and it has become home of the debut of  the efforts of Gondwana Studios and myself in this very ambitious project… and that might be calling to your city one of these days!DSC06663

It has take us two years and (specially) the enormous efforts and dedication of Peter Norton,  that has also entrusted me as curator and illustrator of this project… you will never see the chronicle of the evolution of dinosaur skin the same way anywhere!  From  sclaes,protofeathers, to quills, to spikes, to feathers and the arms race that only one group of dinosaurs would win!

DSC06714

We have gone to painstaking efforts to gather as many notorious specimens as possible. Unfortunately the venue space hasn’t allowed to mount all the specimens and have them in the order I originally envisioned. But we do have casts of Heterodontosaurus,  Archaeopteryx, AnchiornisSinosauropteryx, Caudipteryx, Confuciusornis, Microraptor and the famous quilled psittacosaur…DSC06671DSC06673

And direct from our friends in  Lyme Regis, a cast of the most complete Scelidosaurus to date !DSC06674DSC06676

DSC06682

My ambition was to have life-size murals together with the wonderful specimens specially mounted and artfully finished by Peter Norton,  but we will have to wait until the next time. Still it looks wonderful.  Peter managed to include all these ceratopsian skulls , Saichania (including the tail club)Oviraptor, a Velociraptor hunting Avimimus, the arms of Deinocheirus and even Nothronychus…  and of course the tour-de-force, the peak of the arms struggle, the final collision of Ornithischia and Saurischia: Tarbosaurus vs. Talarurus! Only the descendants of one group would survive until now.

DSC06687

DSC06703DSC06698Velo Avi copyDSC06700DSC06689.jpgDSC06704

But what is really a novelty of this exhibition is its focus: we are aiming to show wider audiences a novel approach to understand the evolution of the Dinosauria and the triumph of one of its branches thanks to taking to the air using its peculiar skin structures: the birds’ feathers.

The exhibition is available for hire, with the potential of of using much more material  depending on the space (Including Pachycephalosaurs, Stegosaurs and even more Therizinosaurs and Ankulosaurs) … For more information  please do contact Peter Norton at  Gondwana Studios  for a PDF leaflet… or myself. Spread the word!

Expect more news  (and better pictures) about it in the very near future.

Posted in Archaeopteryx, Birds, ceratopsians, Deinocheirids, Dinosaur Models, Dinosaur rEvolution, maniraptora, Museum Displays, Ornithischians, ornithomimosaurs, oviraptorosaurs, pachycephalosaurs, Raptors, therizinosaurs, Theropods, tyrannosaurs, Uncategorized, velociraptor | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

A new take on Yehuecauhceratops.

Luis V. Rey Updates Blog

Yehue copy.jpgThe danger of having extremely fragmentary dinosaur remains like the ones found in Mexico is that they are  bound to different interpretations… and if we are not careful we can end up in opposite directions when it is time to reconstruct the animals. Meet my own take to a male and a female Yehuecauhceratops mudei, the  now famous  mid-sized ceratopsian from the Late Cretaceous Coahuila, Mexico.

I have been aided by Angel Ramírez in the reconstruction. As you can see I have also increased and bloated the size of the nostrils according to the latest trends of research… the space is massive so it is justified!

We followed closely the very fragmentary remains of the skull (specially the frill). And this is the final result… It appears to have been recognised by (among others) Peter Dodson as a closer relative to  Nasutoceratops than to Chasmosaurus and the model used…

View original post 183 more words

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

A new take on Yehuecauhceratops.

Yehue copy.jpgThe danger of having extremely fragmentary dinosaur remains like the ones found in Mexico is that they are  bound to different interpretations… and if we are not careful we can end up in opposite directions when it is time to reconstruct the animals. Meet my own take to a male and a female Yehuecauhceratops mudei, the  now famous  mid-sized ceratopsian from the Late Cretaceous Coahuila, Mexico.

I have been aided by Angel Ramírez in the reconstruction. As you can see I have also increased and bloated the size of the nostrils according to the latest trends of research… the space is massive so it is justified!

We followed closely the very fragmentary remains of the skull (specially the frill). And this is the final result… It appears to have been recognised by (among others) Peter Dodson as a closer relative to  Nasutoceratops than to Chasmosaurus and the model used for the frill is more like  than the aforementioned or even better: Avaceratops. So those were the main  references to follow.  The main characters are a reduced squamosal with three undulations (maybe bases for hooking keratinous display structures), a rugose lateral bump and expanded parietals.Yehuecauhceratops-2.png

Yehuecauhceratops mudei NEW ver-2 with skeleton.jpg  Here is his own most recent restoration of  the skeleton by Angel Ramírez. I specially thank him for his help and assistance… and allowing me the artistic license of including a flock of ornithomimids in the background (they are not flocking this way this time!)… together with the de-rigueur hadrosaurs .

This restoration may change in the future  once again, but for the time being this was the best we could come with.

UPDATE. An extra note requested by Angel Ramírez: his reconstruction used the silhouette and skeleton drawing of Scott Hartman of Avaceratops and modified it in what concerns the skull,  so that it looks more like a nasutoceratopsine.

The interpretation is based on the description of Rivera-Sylva, Hendrick and Dodson, 2016. A centrosaurine (dinosauria: ceratopsia) from the Aguja Formation (Late Campanian) of Northern Coahuila, Mexico.

Posted in ceratopsians, hadrosaurs, Mexican Prehistory, ornithomimosaurs, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Tyrannosaurus rex in Mexico?

Trex Mex copy.jpgCoastal Laramidia ( Late Cretaceous).  A couple of T. exes are feasting from a “Sabinosaurio” carcass, while several azdharxhids queue for their turn… Impossible? Not according to Dr.  Claudia Serrano Brañas  that after reading my comments in the previous blog about Totlmimus, through personal communication, graciously gave me this link and comments as  information.

Tyrannosaurid teeth from the Lomas Coloradas Formation, Cabullona Group (Upper Cretaceous) Sonora, México

“Regarding the comment of the tyrannosaurids that were present in the Cabullona Basin of Sonora, my colleagues and I published a paper in 2014 concerning the identification of Tyrannosaurus rex in the Lomas Coloradas Formation, which is the top formation of the Cabullona Group.”

“With regard to the information you request, I leave you with the following comments: When working with isolated teeth, great care must be taken when assigning them to a particular family or genre, as there is a great morphological similarity between many groups Of theropods. In the case of tyrannosaurids, this happens frequently, since their teeth are very similar to each other. For this reason, in addition to the anatomical descriptions of the specimens, different types of statistical analyses using quantitative parameters have now begun to be used in order to discriminate between taxa so that the specimens can be assigned to a group or genus of theropods in particular. In our case, we measured our specimens and compared them with a database that included 342 teeth of different types of theropods and precisely through the analysis of the combination of these variables, we were able to establish that our specimens corresponded to the genus Tyrannosaurus.
On the other hand, I wanted to point out that we are currently working with other teeth of the Cabullona Basin in Sonora, but this time they are from another formation of the same Geological Group (Cabullona Group). These new teeth, although also of tyrannosaurids, are very different from those found in the Lomas Coloradas formation, which would indicate that in addition to having Tyrannosaurus in that area, there were also other types of tyrannosaurids. As soon as I get more information about it, I’ll let you know.”

 So there you have it: Although the remains (mainly  teeth) come undoubtedly from tyrannosaurids, some are diagnostic of T. rex… although there might be some doubters (ready for it Dave Hone?)! It makes complete sense to locate Tyrannosaurus rex in Mexico too. It shared the same environment as the “Sainosaurio” and Tototlmimus.

So understanding that most, if not all of you, need something to cheer you up for having to turn off your TV today (and avoid a really bad remake of the Twilight Zone),  here’s something factual for your solace from this  Blog. An entertaining  beginning of the year no doubt.

Posted in Dinosaurs, Mexican Prehistory, ornithomimosaurs, Pterosaurs, tyrannosaurs, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

… and to end an eventful year: Mexican Ostrich dinosaurs!

totlmimus-copySuddenly I realised that I overlooked this piece of my Mexican Dinosaurs series. Meet a displaying pair of Tototlmimus packardensis (Serrano-Brañas et al 2016) from Cuenca Cabullona, Sonora some 72 million years ago. An obvious relative of the Canadian Ornithomimus, it was indeed pretty robust 4-meter ornithomimosaur, with stouter and longer legs and arms that its cousin, according to Angel Ramirez.

I got the inspiration for this piece in an old painting of two ostriches displaying… the shared anatomical features  might have lead to  coincidental behaviour! Incorporated is the newly discovered feathery distribution in ornithomimids. The environment is again coastal and  shared by some hadrosaurs (like the included, still unnamed “Sabinosaurus”), ceratopsians and tyrannosaurs… one of which could have been the famous Tyrannosaurus rex according to some footprints (but this needs evidence for definitive confirmation).sabino

Thanking everybody for their support, specially our friends in the national Museum of Natural History in Denmark, Mexico’s Universum and UNAM, Spain, Australia’s Gondwana Studios, Italy, France, StoneCo and Silver Plume and the many fans in the U.S., Bristol  and London, that’s all from me in this eventful 2016 from here, “springtime London”! For the record: Twelve degrees Celsius the 25th of December! This reminds me a crispy, clear winter day in Barcelona more than 35 years ago. It was bitterly cold but nevertheless, somehow in the sun you felt the warmth of its rays (something that never happened to us before)… I was with a friend ands we joked: “I wonder if that’s what the dinosaurs felt just before they went extinct… they looked at the sky and felt that something was different… 

To counter all the state of denial, madness and irrationality of the world as it is today, there’s nothing better than Science… if two Stegosaurus were capable of successfully mating (carefully!) everything positive is possible with good will and determination… the only things humans need to survive is common sense and wisdom…even if more often than not we glorify our lack of both of them!

Posted in Dinosaur rEvolution, Mexican Prehistory, Natural History Museum of Denmark, NHM Events, Ornithischians, ornithomimosaurs, tyrannosaurs, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Some therapy you can do after the current horror stories worldwide… and with one and a half eye!

This gallery contains 3 photos.

Peter Norton from Gondwana Studios has been around to take down the Hatching The Past exhibition from the Horniman Museum (an unprecedented success!). Looking forward to see it in Cardiff  next!  We have also continued our task to finish off … Continue reading

Gallery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

More Mexican Dinosaurs: Labocania anomala.

labocania-copyIn my series about Mexican Dinosaurs, I haven’t been able to avoid repeatedly the use of violent scenes… that is what popular palaeontology is about according to some of the kids  attending my workshops last week: VIOLENCE… and gore… of course! Well, this may be justified for primitive tyrannosaurs like tho enigmatic Labocania  (from La Bocana Roja, Baja California 83 million years agoattacking an even more enigmatic primitive hadrosaur. We know that the fossil remains in Mexico are most of the time fragmentary… but the traces of the predator and prey are there for sure!

I reconstructed Labocania based on the work o Angel Ramírez, that reappraises Labocania as an eight meter long.  peculiar  and robust Chilantasurus or Schezuanosauruslike theropod with primitive tyrannosaur characteristics…  I added some touches of  the better known Yutyrannus (three fingers and plenty of feathers). Until we get more remains it will continue to be anomalous, as its name describes it!

We know even less about the prey but according to the age, it must have been a primitive hadrosaur similar to Huehuacanauhtlus...

There was a time when North America had no frontiers and only an inner sea as boundaries… sometimes even South America hooked up with it… dinosaurs roamed freely across the continent and  an enormous, rich diversity prevailed…  suddenly a catastrophe struck  and their environment collapsed. Only the small dinosaurs, with their wings could fly away and survive. Any similarity with modern times is not mere coincidence… only this time disasters are man made!dsc01904

The artwork was also immortalised in 3D by Aldebaran (Aldo) Castañeda with one of his fomisaurios tailor made for me… here having a drink with and René Hernández!

Posted in Dinosaur Models, Mexican Prehistory, Theropods, tyrannosaurs, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment